WHY I RATE:
Deep Green

Selected by: James Keith

Name: Deep Green

Where He’s From: Sheffield

When He Started: 2005

Genre: Rap

File Next To: SafOne, Skrapz, Ratlin

Sounds like: “That old-school factor, but with bars! I think about my lyrics and try and paint a real picture when I rap. I just speak on my reality.”

First Music That Inspired Him: “There wasn’t really a particular song, but when I first heard Snoop Dogg, like his whole sound—from his flow to his production—songs like “Who Am I? (What’s My Name?)” just had me thinking this music thing is cold! But even before that, I remember seeing behind-the-scenes footage of older artists—like singers and stuff—in the studio recording, and I just rated the whole setup.”

A contemporary of fellow Steel City sprayer Coco, rising Sheffield rapper Deep Green has more than put the hours in. Over the past decade and a bit, he’s spent much of his time studying the greats, perfecting his flow and carving out his own lane in a rap scene that’s becoming increasingly receptive to regional accents—especially when they lend themselves to rap as well as the Sheffield accent does.

Though he tells us he first started making music in 2005, it wasn’t until 2012 that Deep Green fully emerged with a studio-recorded track and video. That track was “Hometown”, the famous Adele cut favoured by just about every rapper you can think of. “Loads of rappers from all over the country jumped on that riddim and spoke about where they grew up,” he tells TRENCH, “so I felt the responsibility being from Sheffield to rep for us as well, so I just did my thing. I shot a video for it and got some nice views (430k+ and counting) so that gave me encouragement to keep going as an artist.”

The rhymer’s latest single, “Quavo”, is an homage to the Migos frontman of the same name and sees a jewellery-clad D.G looking like a boss and handling business as he lays out his intoxicating flow that sits in a hazy intersection between rapping and singing. While that may sound like a territory that a lot of rappers are exploring right now—thanks in part to people like the track’s namesake—Deep Green’s particular brand of melodic rap is a lot richer than most, with a low register and a Yorkshire twang that drifts out the speaker like syrup.

As for the future, Deep Green’s remaining level-headed: “To be honest, I don’t really put too much expectation on many things in life, only for my kids. So just elevating, while gaining new passengers on my journey, is enough for me.” It’s a level of maturity that can only come with years of experience, and so far it seems to be serving him perfectly well. “The kind of things my fans say to me about how I get them through tough times, that’s enough for me,” D.G says. “I’ll always keep making music for them.”

TRENCH Highlight...


Posted on September 18, 2019